The Season


































The Three Musketeers

Alexandre Dumas began releasing THE THREE MUSKETEERS in serial form in 1844, and it has been thrilling audiences in print, on the stage, and on the screen ever since. What is it about these characters that so fascinate us? Is it the bravery? The sense of honor? The willingness to sacrifice all for a friend at the drop of the hat? The endless Swashbuckling?

Certainly the romance of the time and the political intrigues capture our attention and never lets go until the end. But the characters linger on long after the book is closed. Dumas himself was fascinated by his own creation and brought The Musketeers back for a couple of sequels. His son was said to have found his father weeping over his writing table because he had just written the death of Porthos.

I have to confess my own fascination with the story began in the movie theater, in 1973.
It was Richard Lester’s masterpiece with a screenplay by George MacDonald Fraser. And it was a time when you were able to sit through as many showings as you liked after buying your ticket. I sat through it over and over again.

Since then I have been involved both as an actor and a fight choreographer in several stage productions.  As good as some of these were (my favorite stage version is by the late great David Richmond) there was always so much of the book missing. This then lead me to attempt my own adaptation. And in attempting, I’m afraid, I too have had to leave much of the book behind.

 My hope is that you will enjoy the adventure and the courageous performers who are undertaking it and that at your earliest convenience after coming home from the theater you will dust off your old copy of The Three Musketeers, and read!

Gordon Carpenter
















The Three Musketeers

Alexandre Dumas began releasing THE THREE MUSKETEERS in serial form in 1844, and it has been thrilling audiences in print, on the stage, and on the screen ever since. What is it about these characters that so fascinate us? Is it the bravery? The sense of honor? The willingness to sacrifice all for a friend at the drop of the hat? The endless Swashbuckling?

Certainly the romance of the time and the political intrigues capture our attention and never lets go until the end. But the characters linger on long after the book is closed. Dumas himself was fascinated by his own creation and brought The Musketeers back for a couple of sequels. His son was said to have found his father weeping over his writing table because he had just written the death of Porthos.

I have to confess my own fascination with the story began in the movie theater, in 1973.
It was Richard Lester’s masterpiece with a screenplay by George MacDonald Fraser. And it was a time when you were able to sit through as many showings as you liked after buying your ticket. I sat through it over and over again.

Since then I have been involved both as an actor and a fight choreographer in several stage productions.  As good as some of these were (my favorite stage version is by the late great David Richmond) there was always so much of the book missing. This then lead me to attempt my own adaptation. And in attempting, I’m afraid, I too have had to leave much of the book behind.

 My hope is that you will enjoy the adventure and the courageous performers who are undertaking it and that at your earliest convenience after coming home from the theater you will dust off your old copy of The Three Musketeers, and read!

Gordon Carpenter

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 360-331-2939 or email
July 14-September 3,
Shows Thursday through Sunday at 6:00,
(matinees at 1:00 Saturdays in August).
Island Shakespeare Festival is located at 5476 Maxwelton Road, Langley, WA 98260 (MAP)
Mailing address:
PO Box 1262
Langley, WA, 98260
Click HERE for the performance schedule.